Our middle daughter, Janetta Emmelhainz, is currently in China, helping to teach English to 4-6th grade students. She made the following observations in a recent email:

I had an interesting conversation with one of the internationals that’s been here for more than a decade about Native American connections to China.  Apparently there is a specific cultural group of Tibetans (I don’t know which one) that have some very close cultural similarities to the Hopi in the US.  So close that there is actually a matching set of prophecies between the two groups.  In general there are a lot of similarities between Native Americans and native people here, possibly just due to the fact that indigenous people often have similarities in outlook, etc.  There are also theories that the connections come from the migration of native people from Asia to the Americas over the Bering Land Bridge however many centuries ago.  I was amused at how comfortable it was to have so many native looking people around me as I walked down the street.  The Tibetans, especially the more elderly ones, look very similar to the Navajo and other groups that I saw a lot around New Mexico and Arizona in the last few years.  I haven’t spent nearly as much time with the Navajo as my parents have but I have still apparently grown used to being surrounded by more than just white people!

"Cousin-Brothers" -- Kevin (on the left) is fully part of the Salazar Family, but not by birth

“Cousin-Brothers” — Kevin (on the left) is fully part of the Salazar Family, but not by birth

The other random thing that connected the Navajo to the Chinese was the idea of Cousin-brothers!  For the Navajo cousin-brothers comes mostly out of the matrilineal structure to their families–cousins on the mother’s side are connected because of the matriarch and matter more because of it.  Often cousins are even raised together.  The Navajo don’t differentiate between first and second cousins, or even cousins and brothers, because the distance really doesn’t matter as long as you are still considered in the same family group.  The reasoning is different in China, but here cousins are called brothers as well.  Because of the one-child rule there have been very few siblings in Han Chinese families in the last 50 years.  Therefore cousins were often as close as siblings.  So, they’re cousin-brothers.

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