This is the final guest post written by a visiting anthropology student. You can read more about the author and his goals HERE. As a side-note from Jill–the topics in this post are definitely still part of the heritage of the Navajo people. A few families in the Lybrook area still follow traditional ways, including using the Navajo language in the home and teaching these traditional values to their children. However, the great majority of students at Lybrook School (approx. 100 students) no longer hold these values and learn about these topics through Bilingual class at the public school rather than from their parents.

Mountains. One of the attractions in Northwest New Mexico is big mountains and mesas. Mountains, because of their higher elevation, are greener than the surrounding areas. As I have more knowledge of Navajo people, I find that mountains are an important element in Navajo culture. Four sacred mountains in Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona are the boundaries of Navajoland: Blanca Peak (east), Mount Taylor (south), San Francisco Peaks (west) and Hesperus Mountain (north). According to Kahn-John (2010), “Din’e  relationship with geography is vital because this relationship provides a sense of stability, safety, confidence, and connection to Mother Earth and the sacred lands of the Din’e” (see note).

(map from the Navajo Nation)

(map from the Navajo Nation)

Clan. A Navajo man told me that the clan was important in Navajo society, and that people tended to identify themselves based on their clan wherever they went. His words reminded me of the Eurasian nomads, among which the clan is also a basic concept organizing social relations. The difference is that Navajo clan is matrilineal. Individually, Navajo people identify themselves based on the four clans they belong to, in the order of mother’s, father’s, maternal grandfather’s and paternal grandfather’s clan. There were four original clans, and then some disappeared and some others were created (Csordas 1999). The new ones show the fact that non-Navajo peoples became a member of Navajo society (Csordas 1999).

Harmony. Harmony is an important concept for Navajo people. According to Haskan (2007), “They have a strong belief in harmony and balance mentally, physically, socially, spiritually.” In introducing traditional Navajo culture, Quintero (1997) states that “Traditional values center around living a balanced, harmonious life in a world that is at once natural, social, and supernatural.” The concept of harmony corresponds to scholars’ view that Native people tend toward understanding the world from a holistic perspective (White 1998).

Note: Din’e means “people” in Navajo language, and is what Navajo people call themselves.

 

References:

Csordas, Thomas. 1999. Ritual Healing and the Politics of Identity in Contemporary Navajo Society. American Ethnologist 26 (1): 3-23

Haskan, Melanie Lee. 2007. How the No Child Left Behind Act Impacted Bilingual Education in a Rural School with Navajo Students. Ph.D Dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University.

Kahn-John, Michelle. 2010. Concept Analysis of Din´e H´ozh´o: A Din´e Wellness Philosophy. Advances in Nursing Science 33 (2): 113–125

Quintero, Gilbert. 1997. The Discourse on Drinking in Navajo Society. Ph.D Dissertation, University of Arizona.

White, Kalvin G. 1998. Navajo Adolescent Cultural Identity and Depression. Ph.D Dissertation, The University of Utah.

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