This is number 19 in a series of Guest Posts by a visiting anthropology student. You can read more about these posts HERE. This post is a little more scholarly than most of these posts have been. On Friday, I will put up my very non-scholarly musings on what we observed of Navajo families. You can see that post HERE.

From my communication with Navajo people here, I conclude that currently, in this area, a typical household has more than two children, and probably much more than that. I want to know how Navajo population has been changing in relation to the overall population of the United States. The assumption is that if the Navajo population has been increasing at a faster pace than that of the United States, its influence on American society should be increasing.

My method is to compare the Navajo population to the US population at three time points: 1990, 2000 and 2010, in order to know the relative change in Navajo population versus the US. My data is both from secondary sources of scholarly study and US Census Bureau. The data are slightly different from each other. It should be noted that there are two sets of statistical data. One is about the total Navajo population in the US, and the other the population of Navajo Nation which geographically includes part of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah.

The following data is from scholarly studies. According to US Census 1990 (Quintero 1997), the Navajo population was above 225,000. White’s study (1998) shows that the population of Navajo Nation in 1990 was 151,105 according to the US Census. National Center for Educational Statistics 2000 data show that the Navajo Nation population was 181,270 (Haskan 2007). Washington and Hover’s study (2011) shows that the Navajo population in the whole country was 298,215 based on the 2000 Census. According to the Navajo tribe’s census office, the population of Navajo Nation was 300,048 in 2010 (Donovan 2011).

My own search of US Census Bureau website yield slightly different data. The total Navajo population is 225,298 in 1990, 298,197 in 2000 and 332,129 in 2010. The total US population is 248,709,873 in 1990, 281,421,906 in 2000 and 308,745,538 in 2010. Even though there is difference between the above figures, it does not affect the ratio of Navajo population to the US population substantially. We get the ratio of Navajo population to the total US population. It is 0.091% in 1990, 0.11% in 2000 and 0.11% in 2010. For the ratio of Navajo Nation population to the US population, it is 0.061% in 1990, 0.064% in 2000 and 0.097% in 2010.

The trend is that both the Navajo population and Navajo Nation population have been increasing relative to the US population from 1990 to 2010. In recent years, however, the increase rate of Navajo population to the US population seems to have slowed down. For Navajo Nation, the increase rate has been accelerated. Further research is needed to understand the causes of total Navajo population and Navajo Nation population changes, so is the complications of the changes for Navajo and the US society.

References:

Donovan, Bill. 2011. Census: Navajo Enrollment Tops 300,000. Navajo Times. http://navajotimes.com/news/2011/0711/070711census.php

Haskan, Melanie Lee. 2007. How the No Child Left Behind Act Impacted Bilingual Education in a Rural School with Navajo Students. Ph.D Dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University.

Quintero, Gilbert. 1997. The Discourse on Drinking in Navajo Society. Ph.D Dissertation, University of Arizona.

US Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/

Washington, Elizabeth and Stephanie Hover. 2011. Diné Bikéya: Teaching about Navajo Citizenship and Sovereignty. The Social Studies 102(2): 80-87.

White, Kalvin G. 1998. Navajo Adolescent Cultural Identity and Depression. Ph.D Dissertation, The University of Utah.

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