We finally have the results for the school-district-wide Science Fair. If you remember, in an earlier post I talked about some of our Lybrook students who did well with their projects and advanced to the district level.

judging science fair

Interactive Judging of Projects

I was quite proud of all of the students who competed on this level. They often find it difficult to talk with strangers, ducking their heads, speaking hardly above a whisper. I challenged them to at least look at their display boards, even if they couldn’t manage to look directly at the judges.

Most of them were quite nervous, but when it was their time to be interviewed, each of them moved out of their comfort zones and stepped up to the challenge. They talked clearly about what they had done in their projects. They answered questions quickly, without long silences. Some were even animated, looking at the judges, pointing to their displays, gesturing with their hands as they explained their ideas.

Unfortunately, only 7th and 8th grade students can progress to the Regional Science Fair. None of our students at that level won at the district competition. However, we have three beautiful big rosette ribbons in the display case at Lybrook School.

Maurice won 3rd place in the Middle School competition (6thgrade) for his project on AIR.

maurice

maurice

Anna won 3rd place in the Elementary School division (4thgrade) for her project on G-FORCE and centripetal force on merry-go-rounds.

anna

anna

Noah won 1st place in the Elementary School competition (4thgrade) for his project on identifying different  types of FINGERPRINTS.

noah

noah

A big CONGRATULATIONS to all of the Lybrook Students who participated in the Science Fair competitions this year!

(And here is a little more information about Noah’s project for readers who would like more details…

On the day before Lybrook School’s science fair, one student was excited about the previous day’s fieldtrip to Sandia Labs in Albuquerque.  At this by-invitation-only event, students had solved a mystery using a variety of forensic techniques. Noah was fascinated by the fingerprinting process. He had previously shown little interest in completing a science project. But now he wondered if he could do something with fingerprinting.

His teacher asked if I had time to help him. I was happy to do so. We talked about what he had learned, made some plans, and ran around the school collecting fingerprints from a variety of teachers, staff, and students. “I promise I won’t use this for anything bad…really…”

Noah then analyzed the fingerprints, decoding which type of print each one was: loop, double loop, tented arch, whirl, and more. He spent a long time making a bar graph of the results and carefully coloring the bars to make it more visible. He gathered his thoughts and made a report, summarizing what he had learned. He put together a nice-looking display. He interviewed well, not too shy to tell the judges what he had learned.

Noah was quite excited to be chosen as one of the students representing the fourth grade class of Lybrook School for the district-wide event. Again, he talked excitedly with the judges about what he had learned. At the end of the day, he was pleased to find that a number of spectators had noticed his invitation and had added their own fingerprints to his collection sheet. More prints to analyze…heaven!

It took a few weeks for the results…but you should have seen Noah’s grin from ear to ear when he was given his big, blue, rosette ribbon for 1st place at the Elementary Science Fair District Competition! Way to go, Noah!)

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